In the garden

some tid bit about Trees here

 

Trees & shrubs planting tips

Planting and Positioning Your choice of tree or shrub will depend on two main things, the size of the area that you wish to fill, and the reason you are filling that spot. When considering a plant for a certain area, be sure to consider the plant's ultimate size. Be sure not to plant too close to houses, garages, or other permanent structures. Trees and shrubs can be planted anytime from spring to fall. If the ground can be worked you can plant.

 

Tree and Shrub Planting Steps

  • Dig a hole 2 times the width of the root-ball or the pot that the plant comes in and a little deeper

  • Remove the plant from its pot or remove burlap if bare root and gently massage roots

  • Plant the tree or shrub in the hole at the same level it was planted in the pot

  • Fill in hole with a mixture of topsoil and compost

  • Water plant in well and fertilize with a transplant fertilizer (10-52-10) or Myke

 

Note: Peat pots should be removed from all plants planted in the Calgary area, as they do not degrade quickly in our short growing season

 

 

Spring planting is preferable for most roses, vines, shrubs, trees and evergreens. However, the advent of the containerized nursery stock has extended the planting season to match the growing season. With proper care these plants can be planted any time during the growing season, from spring thaw to fall freeze-up. By following a number of simple steps you will be able to successfully plant containerized nursery stock. Remember that containers of all types and wraps other than burlap should be removed from the root ball before or during planting.

 

Bare Root Stock

The most commonly available bare root shrub is Cotoneaster (Cotoneaster lucida), which is use as a hedging material. Caragana and Lilac are also available. Until planted keep the root system of bare root plants moist. Protect bare root plants from drying out in the sun and wind by storing them in a shaded location with the roots wrapped in plastic or submerged in a bucket of water. Dig holes, or a trench, large enough to accommodate the plant's entire root system without crowding. Set the plants in the holes so that the ground level is even with or slightly higher than the top of the root system. Pull the topsoil in around the plant's root system to fill the hole. Tamp the topsoil in firmly around the base of the plant with the sole of your shoe. This eliminates air pockets and ensures good contact between the topsoil and the root system. Create a tree well or indentation, which will hold water, around the base of the plant. Water the plant thoroughly by filling this indentation with a solution of water and a plant starter such as a 10-52-10. Water the plant whenever the soil surface dries out, usually bi-weekly, during the first growing season to ensure the plant's survival.

 

Use a water-soluble high phosphorus fertilizer (10-60-10, 10-52-10, 5-15-5) for rooting or Myke.

 

 

Balled and Bur lapped Stock

Dig a hole 15 cm. deeper and 30 cm. wider in diameter than the root ball. Place the plant in the hole and check to ensure that ground level is even with the top of the root ball. Cut and loosen the burlap wrap on the root ball, removing the burlap from the top of the root ball, and leave it around the sides, to hold the soil around the roots. As you pull the topsoil in around the root ball to fill in the hole, tamp the topsoil down firmly with your shoe. This eliminates air pockets and ensures good contact between the topsoil and the root system. Create a tree well, which will hold water, around the base of the plant. Water the plant thoroughly by filling the depression with a solution of water and a plant starter such as Schultz 10-60-10. Water the plant deeply whenever the soil surface dries out, generally biweekly, during the first growing season to ensure the plant's survival.

 

 

Containerized Stock

Dig a hole 15 cm. deeper and 30 cm. wider in diameter than the container in which the plant is growing. With the container on, set the plant in the hole to ensure that the ground level is even with the top of the root ball. Remove the plant from the hole and carefully, so as not to disturb the soil around the root system, remove the root ball from the container. Place the root ball back into the hole. As you pull topsoil in around the plant to fill the hole, tamp the topsoil down firmly with the sole of your shoe. This eliminates air pockets and ensures good contact between the topsoil and the root system. Create a tree well or indentation, which will hold water, around the base of the plant. Water the plant thoroughly by filling this indentation with a solution of water and a root starter such as Schultz 10-60-10. Water the plant deeply whenever the soil surface dries out, generally biweekly, during the first growing season to ensure the plant's survival.

 

 

Staking a Tree

Due to the windy conditions in the Calgary area all but the smallest of trees require staking. Staking keeps trees straight while they are rooting and prevents uprooting during wind storms. There are two methods of staking trees: using guy wires, or metal posts or wooden stakes. When staked, a tree should be able to move a few inches, as this will encourage strong root and trunk development.

 

 

Guy Wires

Attached 3 guy wires to the tree, 2/3 the way up the tree. Protect the tree's bark by wrapping the portion of the wire contacting the tree trunk with a section of garden hose. Run one wire toward the northwest, directly into the prevailing winds, and attach it to a small stake, 40 cm. long, driven into the ground about two meters away from the base of the tree. Run the other two wires out from the tree ensuring even spacing between the three guy wires. Attach these wires to similar small stakes. Make sure that each of the 3 wires are evenly tightened.

 

 

Metal or Wooden Stakes

Select a metal or wooden stake that is about one meter taller than the tree you are staking. Locate the stake on the NW side of the tree as this is the origin of most prevailing winds in Calgary. Drive the stake into the ground next to the tree making sure that the stake passes on the outside of the root ball. Pound the stake in deep enough to secure it, about one meter. Attach the tree to the stake using plastic tree ties or wire. Cover the wire with a section of garden hose where it contacts the tree trunk so as not to damage the bark.